How Quaker Meetings Work

A Quaker meeting is a local worshipping community. Quaker meetings follow the guidance of the Spirit in business as well as in worship.

Quaker meetings function by appointing members to offices and committees. These volunteers prepare business that comes to the entire group for Spirit-led decision-making. Most meetings have no paid workers; some meetings may hire part-time childcare, cleaning, grounds keeping, or administrative
workers. Everyone is welcome to participate in the work of the meeting.

Committees

The bulk of the work is done by committees according to the meeting’s needs and concerns. Different committees may care for the quality of worship, finances, peace and justice work, hospitality, religious education, nurturing members, and care of the building, if any.

Committees:
• Perform specific tasks.
• Think through issues.
• Come up with recommendations to present to the full meeting for consideration and decision-making during a meeting for business.

Meeting for Business

The community has a monthly meeting where we make decisions. We use the collective discernment of members as well as tradition and Scripture to help us understand God’s will for us.

The Clerk

The clerk of the meeting has the role of a servant leader. The clerk:
• Serves as the center of communication within the meeting.
• Guides the conduct of business meetings.
• Serves as the contact person with regional Quaker bodies.
• Speaks on behalf of the meeting when a spokesperson is required.

Finances

Most meetings have a Finance Committee which draws up an annual budget. You can contribute to the meeting by giving money to the Treasurer.

Membership

When you have attended meeting for a period of time and regularly participate in worship, business meetings, and the life of the community, you may begin to feel a spiritual tie to the community. You may want to consider becoming a member. The Clerk can explain the process, which is also detailed in our book
of Faith & Practice.

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